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Sugar Content Lists

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Nuegreen created this page because of those 2 statements. It's our hope that this information will help you be able to affect change. 

Fructose, Glucose & Sucrose content in 1,285 foods, from (A-Z)

Fructose, Glucose & Sucrose content in Fast Food

Foods with the Highest Amounts of Fructose 

The Evidence has been coming in for a while
J Am Coll Nutr. 2009 Dec;28(6):619-26.  The Effects of High Fructose Syrup.
High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has become an increasingly common food ingredient in the last 40 years. However, there is concern that HFCS consumption increases the risk for obesity and other adverse health outcomes compared to other caloric sweeteners. The most commonly used types of HFCS (HFCS-42 and HFCS-55) are similar in composition to sucrose (table sugar), consisting of roughly equal amounts of fructose and glucose. The primary difference is that these monosaccharides exist free in solution in HFCS, but in disaccharide form in sucrose. The disaccharide sucrose is easily cleaved in the small intestine, so free fructose and glucose are absorbed from both sucrose and HFCS. The advantage to food manufacturers is that the free monosaccharides in HFCS provide better flavor enhancement, stability, freshness, texture, color, pour-ability, and consistency in foods in comparison to sucrose. Because the composition of HFCS and sucrose is so similar, particularly on absorption by the body, it appears unlikely that HFCS contributes more to obesity or other conditions than sucrose does. Nevertheless, few studies have evaluated the potentially differential effect of various sweeteners, particularly as they relate to health conditions such as obesity, which develop over relatively long periods of time. Improved nutrient databases are needed to analyze food consumption in epidemiologic studies, as are more strongly designed experimental studies, including those on the mechanism of action and relationship between fructose dose and response. At the present time, there is insufficient evidence to ban or otherwise restrict use of HFCS or other fructose-containing sweeteners in the food supply or to require the use of warning labels on products containing HFCS. Nevertheless, dietary advice to limit consumption of all added caloric sweeteners, including HFCS, is warranted.
Moeller SMFryhofer SAOsbahr AJ 3rdRobinowitz CBCouncil on Science & Public Health, American Medical Association McCaffree MAFryhofer SAGitlow SHead CAKhan MKKridel RWLevin IRMorisy LRRobinowitz CBSabbatini AWoods GLDickinson BD.
Source: Medicine and Public Health Division, American Medical Association, Chicago, IL 60654, USA. suzen.moeller@ama-assn.org

There was some progress in three years, but.. Still kicking the can?
Rev Med Suisse 2012 Mar 7;8(331):513,515-8. Sucrose, Glucose, Fructose Consumption: What are the impacts on metabolic health?
There is growing evidence that consumption of added sugars play a role in the recent increase of metabolic diseases: 1) The intake of derived caloric sweeteners has increased in conjunction with rising prevalence of obesity; 2) Epidemiologic data and experimental studies show a positive correlation between sugar, fructose or sweetened beverages consumption and component of the metabolic syndrome. Several questions regarding effect of natural sugars on health are not answered yet, particularly the interactions between sugar intake and environment factors including ethnicity background and physical activity. Only Interventional studies will elucidate if there is a causal relation between sugar intake and metabolic diseases in humans. [Article in French] Tran CTappy L.
Source: Division of medical genetics and metabolism, 555 University Avenue, Toronto ON M5G 1X8. christel.tran@sickkids.ca

Finally, A Correlation
Glob Public Health. 2013;8(1):55-64. doi: 10.1080/17441692.2012.736257. Epub 2012 Nov 27.
High Fructose Corn Syrup and diabetes prevalence: a global perspective.   Goran MIUlijaszek SJVentura EE.
The overall aim of this study was to evaluate, from a global and ecological perspective, the relationships between availability of High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) and prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Using published resources, country-level estimates (n =43 countries) were obtained for: total sugar, HFCS and total calorie availability, obesity, two separate prevalence estimates for diabetes, prevalence estimate for impaired glucose tolerance and fasting plasma glucose. Pearson's correlations and partial correlations were conducted in order to explore associations between dietary availability and obesity and diabetes prevalence. Diabetes prevalence was 20% higher in countries with higher availability of HFCS compared to countries with low availability, and these differences were retained or strengthened after adjusting for country-level estimates of body mass index (BMI), population and gross domestic product (adjusted diabetes prevalence=8.0 vs. 6.7%, p=0.03; fasting plasma glucose=5.34 vs. 5.22 mmol/L, p=0.03) despite similarities in obesity and total sugar and calorie availability. These results suggest that countries with higher availability of HFCS have a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes independent of obesity.
Source: Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. goran@usc.edu PMID:23181629 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]